Types Of Kangaroos

Types Of Kangaroos. Kangaroos are a type of mammal found in Australia. There are four types of kangaroos that are easily recognized: red, Western Grey, Eastern Grey, and Common.

Antilopine Kangaroo

This species of kangaroos is also known as the antilopine wallaroo or the antilopine wallaby and they live mainly in the northern parts of Australia. The fur on these types of kangaroos share the same color and texture as deer’s fur, but it’s still much different than that of an antelope.

These kangaroo varieties also exhibit sexual dimorphism which means that the males and females have different physical characteristics. Male antilopine kangaroos can weigh up to 154 pounds and grow up to 5.9 feet long.

On the other hand, female antilopine kangaroo often weighs less than 66 pounds, typically between 38 and 41 pounds. The males have reddish-tan coat with a pale patch of fur on their chest. The females have greyish to a light tan fur color.”

Western Gray Kangaroo

Western gray kangaroos are native to the southern coast of the southwestern and Western Australia, as well as parts of southern Australia. They have a population of over 2 million in the wild which is not surprising considering they have one of the largest populations of any kangaroo species. This particular type has browner fur, a darker head, long ears that are almost hairless on the back end, and an elbow patch that is blackish when compared to Eastern grays.

The males are also twice as big as females and have longer forearms and more muscle mass than females. Females grow on average to 62-100 pounds, while males can be up to 5 feet tall and weigh 120 pounds. Male western grays produce a distinctive curry smell which earns them the nickname “stinker.”

Eastern Gray Kangaroo

Known as forester kangaroo, great grey kangaroos, and Tasmanian forester kangaroos include thick soft, paler in color than the Western Gray Kangaroo. Males and females are similar in physical appearance; males are still larger, more muscular, and taller. Eastern gray Kangaroos can grow up to 6.9 feet tall with an average total length of about 12 feet. They inhabit parts of eastern Australia and Tasmania.

Also known as forester kangaroo, great grey kangaroo, and Tasmanian forester kangaroo, these types of kangaroos have thick soft, grey-brown fur (lighter in color than the Western Gray Kangaroo), which is paler on the underparts.Males and females in this species are similar in appearance however males are still larger and more muscular than females.

Eastern gray Kangaroos can grow up to the height of 6.9 feet including their head to the tail.Adult males weigh as much as 200 pounds. Meanwhile, females weigh about 37-88 pounds with an average total length of 6 feet. They inhabit parts of eastern Australia and Tasmania.

Red Kangaroo

Kangaroos of all the different types are popular. Red kangaroos are Australia’s national animal and they are also the largest known kind of kangaroo today.Male red kangaroos are bigger and more powerful than females; their fur colors vary depending on gender.

Both male and female red kangaroos have a black and white mark on the sides of their muzzles with a wide white stripe on their cheeks.You can find these kangaroos across mainland Australia but they tend to avoid the more fertile areas in the south, east coast, or northern rainforests.

Of all the different types of kangaroos, the red kangaroo is the most popular. They are Australia’s national animal and emblem. They are also the largest kinds of kangaroos and marsupials on a whole to exist today.Male red kangaroos are bigger and more powerful than females. Their fur is typically a rich reddish-brown color. However, females have more bluish-gray fur.

Both male and female red kangaroos have a black and white mark on the side of their muzzle and a wide white stripe on their cheek.You can find these kangaroos across mainland Australia but they tend to avoid the more fertile areas in the south, the east coast, and the northern rainforests.Fun Fact: The red kangaroo maintains its internal temperature at a point of homeostasis about 36 °C (97 °F) using a variety of physical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations.

 

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